Frequently asked
questions

Eczema and dermatitis are often used interchangeably to describe a group of commonly-occurring skin conditions. They affect up to 1 in 5 children and 1 in 12 adults. The symptoms vary, but can include making the skin dry, red, hot and itchy. It can affect any part of the body, although it most commonly appears on the hands, insides of elbows and behind the knees. It can also become inflamed, leading to additional redness and irritation during ‘flare-ups’.

There are several forms:

Atopic eczema is usually a long-term condition. ‘Atopic’ means sensitivity to allergies. It often involves an overreactive immune system, so can be associated with asthma or hayfever.

Contact eczema is caused by the skin coming into contact with substances that are irritant and/or cause an allergic reaction. Sometimes it develops quickly after exposure. In other cases, the problem builds up gradually over a prolonged period of time.

Seborrhoeic eczema is characterised by red, scaly and sometimes itchy skin patches; often located on areas of the skin with lots of oil-producing glands, such as the scalp, face or chest.

For more information, click here.

No, eczema and dermatitis are not contagious. You, or your children, can't catch eczema by coming into contact with someone with the condition. However, if you aren't sure what’s affecting your skin, we recommend you speak to your GP or pharmacist for advice, as there are some other skin problems that are infectious and can be contagious.

Psoriasis is a common skin disease that affects 1 in 50 people. It occurs equally in men and women and can start at any age. Psoriasis is a long-term condition which may come and go throughout your lifetime. Symptoms include raised silvery patches of skin which have distinct red edges. It does not usually scar the skin, although sometimes it can cause a temporary increase or reduction in skin colour.

The outer layer of skin (the epidermis) contains skin cells which are continuously being replaced. This process normally takes between 3 and 4 weeks. Psoriasis causes skin cells to divide quicker, so that cells are both formed and shed in as little as 3 to 4 days.

Infections, stress, damage to the skin, alcohol, and sometimes intense sunlight may trigger flares of psoriasis.

For more information, click here.

No, psoriasis is not contagious. You, or your children, can't catch psoriasis by coming into contact with someone with the condition. However, if you aren't sure what’s affecting your skin, we recommend you speak to your GP or pharmacist for advice, as there are some other skin problems that are infectious and can be contagious.
Emollients are medical moisturisers which help to prevent water loss from dry skin. Emollients contain oils which work by replacing natural oils in the skin – helping to repair the skin’s natural protective barrier against irritants. Sometimes they also contain ingredients called humectants, which help to hold water in the skin.

Emollients are generally thought to be safe. However, rare individuals can be allergic to any ingredient. So, it’s a good idea, as with any product, to check ingredients, in case there are any that you may be concerned about.

As with any oily product used in large quantities and applied repeatedly over long periods, build-up of dried residue on clothing, bedding and dressings may make these materials more combustible. If using these products, do not smoke or go near naked flames. As a precaution, dressings and clothing should be changed frequently and laundered thoroughly.

Emollients should generally be applied frequently throughout the day. The most suitable interval will vary between different products and different individuals. In some cases, it may vary as the skin conditions vary. As a general rule, emollients should be re-applied as often as necessary to keep the skin feeling moisturised.
Applied steroids should normally be prescribed by a doctor. Sometimes emollients alone are not enough to control eczema and psoriasis, particularly in more severe cases or when the condition flares up. Applied steroids may be necessary under these circumstances, in addition to emollients.

Many soaps, shampoos, body washes and laundry products contain anionic detergents and surfactants. It’s what makes them foamy. These ingredients can be highly irritant for people with problem dry skin. One of the worst culprits is SLS (sodium lauryl sulphate). Anionic detergents and surfactants, particularly SLS, can strip the skin’s natural oils, making problem dry skin worse.

For more information on triggers to avoid, click here.

For tips on taking care of dry skin, click here.

Yes. Diomed Dry Skin emollient is available without a prescription. You’ll find it in the Serious Skincare aisle in Boots, and the skincare section of all good pharmacies and retailers.
Diomed Dry Skin emollient can be used by infants over 1 month old, children, adults and the elderly.

Diomed Dry Skin emollient can be used during pregnancy and while breastfeeding. However, safety trials have not been conducted.

While breastfeeding, care should be taken to avoid the nipple area to avoid inadvertent ingestion by baby.

Diomed Dry Skin emollient does not contain any products of animal origin and has not been tested on animals.
Diomed Dry Skin emollient has not been tested on animals.
Diomed Dry Skin emollient is available in both 500g pump bottles and 100g tubes.
Please see our 'Where to buy' page. You’ll find a list of retailers who stock Diomed Dry Skin and links to where you can buy it online.
Diomed Dry Skin has been designed specifically for problem, dry skin which can often be, sensitive. It has been clinically proven and tested on dry skin conditions such as eczema, dermatitis and psoriasis. However, as with all products, rare individuals can be allergic to any ingredient. If irritation occurs then stop using the product and ask your pharmacist or GP for advice.

The carton and leaflet can both be recycled through most Local Council collection schemes.

The green base of the bottle is made from Polypropylene (PP) which has a Resin Identification Code of 5. Resin Identification Codes are also commonly known as Plastic Codes.

PP can be widely recycled although different Councils have different rules as to what will and will not be collected from home. You will need to check with your Local Council to find out whether PP is collected from your home.

The white bottle is made of Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC) which has a Resin Identification Code of 3. PVC can also be recycled but it is more expensive to do so. As a result, it is not currently collected by many Local Councils.

If your Council does not collect either the base or the bottle, recycling centres accepting PP and PVC packaging can be found here www.recyclenow.com.

Bottles should be thoroughly rinsed out before sending for recycling.

The green neck and white pump itself are not currently collected by Local Councils as they are made of mixed plastics and contain a metal spring that has to be separated out. Again, recycling centres accepting pump packs can be found at www.recyclenow.com.

We are fully committed to building a sustainable future and are investigating packaging that will protect and deliver Diomed Dry Skin in the best way while also being fully and easily recyclable.